Wednesday, October 28, 2009

Swami Vivekananda & His Maha-Samadhi :-A compilation



SWAMI VIVEKANANDA

Swami VIVEKANANDA,

born January 12, 1863 at 6:33 AM in Calcutta (Inde)

Sun in 21°22 Capricorn, AS in 18°06 Capricorn,

Moon in 9°24 Libra, MC in 1°32 Scorpio

Numerology: Birthpath 22


Sisters and Brothers of
America

Published by uttishthata September 10th, 2007 in Vivekananda.

September 11 is the most remarkable day in the history of mankind. On this day an unknown monk from the Holy Land of India with his short but eloquent speech filed with

Universal Humanism addressed the august assembly at the World’s Parliament of Religions at Chicago held in 1893. A crucial event in shaping a more pluralistic, tolerant view of religions was the inaugural World Parliament of Religions in 1893. As part of the Chicago exhibition it was decided to invite participants from all the main religions. Some suggest the Parliament was founded in the expectation of proving the superiority of Christianity over the other religions. This may or may not have been a partial motive, but the idea of inviting representative from different religions was a relative novel concept and an outreach towards greater tolerance. The World Parliament of Religions could possibly have passed into relative anonymity had it not been for the participation of the young Hindu monk Swami Vivekananda. Vivekananda was a direct disciple of Sri Ramakrishna a great saint from Bengal, India. Under his guidance Vivekananda had learnt, practised and embodied the ancient ideals of Vedanta. Foremost Sri Ramakrishna was a devotee of Mother Kali, but after realising the highest spiritual experience in his own sadhana (spiritual discipline) he was inspired to practise with great devotion, the religious and spiritual disciplines of other religions and sects. Thus Ramakrishna was able to proclaim with the inner certainty of direct experience that all religions led to the same goal. For Ramakrishna the unity of all religions was not just a philosophical idea it was something he had realised and experienced himself. As the spiritual successor to Ramakrishna it was fitting that Vivekananda would be able to make such a positive impression on the Parliament of World Religions. In Vivekananda the audience felt a sincere spirituality a religious feeling that was not confrontational but all-inclusive. At his inaugural address Vivekananda began his immortal address with the words sisters and brothers of America. Spontaneously the 4,000 audience rose to their feet in appreciation for the sentiments and spirit of his lofty message. Vivekananda continued. It fills my heart with joy unspeakable to rise in response to the warm and cordial welcome which you have given us… Swami Vivekananda was chosen to represent Hinduism however he did not try to prove the superiority of his religion. Instead Vivekananda spoke with great sincerity about the harmony of world religions and the common spirituality of humanity. It was this universal message of oneness which captivated the audience. As different streams, having their sources in different places, all mingle their water in the sea, so, O Lord, the different paths which men take through different tendencies, various though they appear, crooked or straight, all lead to Thee. Vivekananda proved to be an eloquent exponent of Vedanta and the ideals of all religions. In addition people felt in this handsome and striking Monk a calm detachment, a luminous personality and genuine spirituality.

Vivekananda explained the gist of Hinduism by quoting a sloka from Bhagavad Gita and the Upanishad that explains the concept of Universal acceptance of all religions.

Now let us read the complete text of the speech and get transported to the height of Oneness of Being, Jato Mat Tato Path.

At the World’s Parliament of Religions, Chicago, 11th September, 1893

Response to Welcome

Sisters and Brothers of America,

It fills my heart with joy unspeakable to rise in response to the warm and cordial welcome which you have given us. I thank you in the name of the most ancient order of monks in the world; I thank you in the name of the mother of religions; and I thank you in the name of millions and millions of Hindu people of all classes and sects.

My thanks, also, to some of the speakers on this platform who, referring to the delegates from the Orient, have told you that these men from far-off nations may well claim the honour of bearing to different lands the idea of toleration. I am proud to belong to a religion which has taught the world both tolerance and universal acceptance. We believe not only in universal toleration, but we accept all religions as true. I am proud to belong to a nation which has sheltered the persecuted and the refugees of all religions and all nations of the earth. I am proud to tell you that we have gathered in our bosom the purest remnant of the Israelites, who came to Southern India and took refuge with us in the very year in which their holy temple was shattered to pieces by Roman tyranny. I am proud to belong to the religion which has sheltered and is still fostering the remnant of the grand Zoroastrian nation. I will quote to you, brethren, a few lines from a hymn which I remember to have repeated from my earliest boyhood, which is every day repeated by millions of human beings: “As the different streams having their sources in different places all mingle their water in the sea, so, O Lord, the different paths which men take through different tendencies, various though they appear, crooked or straight, all lead to Thee.“

The present convention, which is one of the most august assemblies ever held, is in itself a vindication, a declaration to the world of the wonderful doctrine preached in the Gita: “Whosoever comes to Me, through whatsoever form, I reach him; all men are struggling through paths which in the end lead to me.” Sectarianism, bigotry, and its horrible descendant, fanaticism, have long possessed this beautiful earth. They have filled the earth with violence, drenched it often and often with human blood, destroyed civilisation and sent whole nations to despair. Had it not been for these horrible demons, human society would be far more advanced than it is now. But their time is come; and I fervently hope that the bell that tolled this morning in honour of this convention may be the death-knell of all fanaticism, of all persecutions with the sword or with the pen, and of all uncharitable feelings between persons wending their way to the same goal.

Hear Swami Vivekananda Speech at Chicago - Welcome Address:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lxUzKoIt5aM

Though it is not the actual voice of Vivekananda, we can feel the power of his thoughts on Hinduism, and his respect for other religions.

Let us celebrate 11th September as Anti-Fanaticism Day

One Response to “Sisters and Brothers of America

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Nanjundiah

Sep 11th, 2007 at 12:30 am

I have worked extensively on Swamiji’s voice. I have checked various sources including the Chicago Historical Society, Library of Congress etc. There is no recording of Swamiji’s voice at that time - there are technological and other reasons for my saying so. Also Swamiji was NOT introduced by a lady as in the voice recording you refer to. The ovation lasted for minutes whereas this recording shows less than a minute. It Is Obviously NOT an original recording. I am glad you are saying in your note that this is not in Swamiji’s voice. But the wrong impression is being conveyed by quoting this recording. I think it was a good idea to reproduce the speech text, but the voice - no.

Nanjundiah

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The Afterlife according to Swami Vivekananda

This body is made of particles which we call matter, and it is dull and insentient. So is what the Vedantists call the fine body. The fine body, according to them, is a material but transparent body, made of very fine particles, so fine that no microscope can see them. What is the use of that? It is the receptacle of the fine forces. Just as this gross body is the receptacle of the gross forces, so the fine body is the receptacle of the fine forces, which we call thought, in its various modifications. First is the body, which is gross matter, with gross force. Force cannot exist without matter. It must require some matter to exist, so the gross forces work in the body; and those very forces become finer; the very force which is working in a gross form works in a fine form and becomes thought. There is no distinction between them, simply one is the gross and the other the fine manifestation of the same thing. Neither is there any distinction between this fine body and the gross body. The fine body is also material, only very fine matter; and just as this gross body is the instrument that works the gross forces, so the fine body is the instrument that works the fine forces.

From where do all these forces come? According to Vedanta philosophy, there are two things in Nature, one of which they call akaslia, which is the substance, infinitely fine, and the other they call prana, which is the force. Whatever you see, or reel, or hear, as air, earth, or anything, is material, -the product of akasha. It goes on and becomes finer and finer, or gross and grosser, changing under the action of prana. Like akaslza, prana is omnipresent, and interpenetrating everything. Akasha is like the water, and everything else in the universe is like blocks of ice, made out of that water, and floating in the water, and prana is the power that changes this akaslza into all these various forms. The gross body is the instrument made out of akasha, for the manifestation of prana in gross forms, as muscular motion, or walking, sitting, talking, and so forth. That fine body is also made of akasha, a very fine form of akasha, for the manifestation of the same prana in the finer form of thought. So, first there is this gross body. Beyond that is this fine body, and beyond that is the Jiva, the real man.

Just as the nails can be pared off many times and yet are still part of our bodies, not different, so is our gross body related to the fine. It is not that a man has a fine and also a gross body; it is the one body only the part which endures longer is the fine body, and that which dissolves sooner is the gross. Just as I can cut this nail any number of times, so millions of times I can shed this gross body, but the fine body will remain. According to the duellists, this Jiva or the real man, is very fine, minute. So far we see that man is a being who has first a gross body which dissolves very quickly, then a fine body which remains through aeons and then a Jiva.

This Jiva, according to the Vedanta philosophy, is eternal just as God is eternal. Nature is also eternal, but changefully eternal. The material of Nature, prana and akasha is eternal, but it is changing into different forms eternally. But the Jiva is not manufactured, either of akasha or prana; it is immaterial and therefore will remain for ever. It is not the result of any combination of prana and akasha, and whatever is not the result of combination will never be destroyed, because destruction is going back to causes.

The gross body is a compound of akasha and prana and therefore will be decomposed. The fine body will also be decomposed, after a long time, but the Jiva is simple, and will never be destroyed. It was never born, for the same reason. Nothing simple can be born. The same argument applies. That which is a compound only can be born. The whole of Nature comprising millions and millions of souls is under the will of God. God is all-pervading, omniscient, formless, everywhere, and He is working through Nature day and night. The whole of it is under His control. He is the eternal Ruler. So say the dualists; Then the question comes, if God is the ruler of this universe, why did He create such a wicked universe, why must we suffer so much?

They say, it is not God's fault. It is our fault that we suffer. Whatever we sow we reap. He did not do anything to punish us. Man is born poor, or blind, or some other way. What is the reason? He had done something before he was born that way. The Jiva has been existing for all the time, was never created. It has been doing all sorts of things all the time. Whatever we do reacts, upon us. If we do good, we shall have happiness, and if evil, unhappiness. So the Jiva goes on enjoying and suffering, and doing all sorts of things.

What comes after death? All these Vedanta philosophers admit that this Jiva is by its own nature pure. But ignorance covers its real nature, they say. As by evil deeds it has covered itself with ignorance, so by good deeds it becomes conscious of its own nature again. Just as it is eternal, so its nature is pure. The nature of every being is pure. When through good deeds all its sins and misdeeds have been washed away, then the Jiva becomes pure again and. when it becomes pure, it goes to what is called Devayana. Its organ of speech enters the mind. You cannot think without words. Wherever there is thought, there must be words. As words enter the mind, so the mind is resolved into the prana and the prana into the Jiva. Then the Jiva gets quickly out of the body, and goes to the solar regions, this universe has sphere after sphere.

This earth is the world sphere, in which are moons, suns, and stars. Beyond that there is the solar sphere, and beyond that another which they call the lunar sphere. Beyond that there is the sphere which they call the sphere of lightning, the electric sphere, and when the Jiva goes there, there comes another Jiva, already perfect to receive it, and takes it to another world, the highest heaven, called the Brahmaloka, where the Jiva lives eternally, no more to be born or to die. It enjoys through eternity and gets all sorts of powers, except the power of creation.

There is only one ruler of the universe and that is God. No one can become God; the dualists maintain that if you say you are God, it is blasphemy. All powers except the creative come to the Jiva, and if it likes to have bodies and work in different parts of the world, it can do so. If it orders all the gods to come before it, if it wants its forefathers to come, they all appear at its command. Such are its powers that it never feels any more pain, and if it wants, it can live in the Brahmaloka through all eternity. This is the highest man, who has attained the love of God, who has become perfectly unselfish, perfectly purified, who has given up all desires, and who does not want to do anything except worship and love God.

There are others that are not so high, who do good works but want some reward. They say they will give so much to the poor, but want to go to heaven in return. When they die what becomes of them?The speech enters the mind, the mind enters the prana, the prana enters the Jiva, and the Jiva gets out, and goes to the lunar sphere, where it has a very good time for a long period. There it enjoys happiness, so long as the effect of its good deeds endures. When the same is exhausted it descends, and once again enters life on earth according to its desire. In the lunar sphere, the Jiva becomes what we call a god, or what the Christians or Mohammedans call an angel. These gods are the names of certain positions; for instance, Indra, the king of the gods, is the name of a position; thousands of men get to that position.

When a virtuous man who has performed the highest of Vedic rites dies, he becomes a king of the gods; by that time the old king has gone down again and become man. Just as kings change here, so the gods, the Devas, also have to die. In heaven they will all die. The only deathless place is Brahmaloka, where alone there is no birth and death.So the Jivas go to heaven, and have a very good time except now and then when the demons give them chase. In our mythology it is said there are demons who sometimes trouble the gods. In all mythologies you read how these demons and the gods fought, and the demons sometimes conquered the gods, although many times, it seems, the demons did not do so many wicked things as the gods. In all mythologies, for instance, you find the Devas fond of women. So after their reward is finished, they fall down again, come through the clouds, through the rains, and thus get into some grain or plant and find their way into the human body, when the grain or plant is eaten by men. The father gives them the material out of which to get a fitting body. When the material suits them no longer, they have to manufacture other bodies. Now there are the very wicked fellows, who do all sorts of diabolical things; they are born again as animals, and, if they are very bad, they are born as very low animals, or become plants, or stones.

In the Deva form they make no Karma at all; only man makes Karma. Karma means work which will produce effect. When a man dies and becomes a Deva he has only a period of pleasure, and during that time makes no fresh Karma; it is simply a reward for his past good Karma. When the good Karma is worked out, then the remaining Karma begins to take effect, and he comes down to earth. He becomes man again, and if he does very good works and purifies himself, he goes to Brahmaloka and comes back no more.

Extract from Hinduism by Swami Vivekananda (ISBN 81-7120-001-X)


Celebrate Unique Janmashtami

http://www.uttishthata.org/2007/09/03/janmashtami/

This intense longing — becoming mad after realising God or getting the knowledge of the Self — is real spirituality. The irresistible madness which the Gopis had for the Lord, Shri Krishna, yea, it is intense longing like that which is necessary for the realisation of the Self! Even in the Gopis’ mind there was a slight distinction of man and woman. But in real Self-knowledge, there is not the slightest distinction of sex.

Such love indeed is necessary for Self-realisation. There must be fretting and pining within the heart. Now from His playful life at Vrindaban come to the Krishna of Kurukshetra, and see how that also is fascinating — how, amidst all that horrible din and uproar of fighting, Krishna remains calm, balanced, and peaceful. Ay, on the very battlefield, He is speaking the Gita to Arjuna and getting him on to fight, which is the Dharma of a Kshatriya! Himself an agent to bring about this terrible warfare, Shri Krishna remains unattached to action — he did not take up arms! To whichsoever phase of it you look, you will find the character of Shri Krishna perfect. As if He was the embodiment of knowledge, work, devotion, power of concentration, and everything! In the present age, this aspect of Shri Krishna should be specially studied. Only contemplating the Krishna of Vrindaban with His flute won’t do nowadays — that will not bring salvation to humanity. Now is needed the worship of Shri Krishna uttering forth the lion-roar of the Gita, of Rama with His bow and arrows, of Mahavira, of Mother Kali. Then only will the people grow strong by going to work with great energy and will. I have considered the matter most carefully and come to the conclusion that of those who profess and talk of religion nowadays in this country, the majority are full of morbidity — crack-brained or fanatic. Without development of an abundance of Rajas, you have hopes neither in this world, nor in the next. The whole country is enveloped in intense Tamas; and naturally the result is — servitude in this life and hell in the next.


If you want any good to come, just throw your ceremonials overboard and worship the Living God, the Man-god — every being that wears a human form — god in His universal as well as individual aspect. The universal aspect of God means this world, and worshipping it means serving it — this indeed is work, not indulging in ceremonials. Neither is it work to cogitate as to whether the rice-plate should be placed in front of the God for ten minutes or for half an hour — that is called lunacy. Millions of rupees have been spent only that the temple-doors at Varanasi or Vrindaban may play at opening and shutting all day long! Now the Lord is having His toilet, now He is taking His meals, now He is busy on something else we know not what. . . . And all this, while the Living God is dying for want of food, for want of education! The banias of Bombay are erecting hospitals for bugs — while they would do nothing for men even if they die! You have not the brain to understand this simple thing — that it is a plague with our country, and lunatic asylums are rife all over. . . . Let some of you spread like fire, and preach this worship of the universal aspect of the Godhead — a thing that was never undertaken before in our country. No quarrelling with people, we must be friends with all. . . .

Spread ideas — go from village to village, from door to door — then only there will be real work. Otherwise, lying complacently on the bed and ringing the bell now and then is a sort of disease, pure and simple. . . . Be independent, learn to form independent judgments. — that such and such a chapter of such and such a Tantra has prescribed a standard length for the handle of a bell,– what matters it to me? Through the Lord’s will, out of your lips shall come millions of Vedas and Tantras and Puranas. . . . If now you can show this in practice, …then only I may have some hope. . . .

I am giving you a new idea. If you can work it out, then I shall know you are men and will be of service. . . . Make an organised plan. A few cameras, some maps, globes, and some chemicals, etc., are needed. The next thing you want is a big hut. Then you must get together a number of poor, indigent folk. Having done all this, show them pictures to teach them astronomy, geography, etc., and preach Shri Ramakrishna to them. Try to have their eyes opened as to what has taken place or is taking place in different countries, what this world is like, and so forth. You have got lots of poor and ignorant folk there. Go to their cottages, from door to door, in the evening, at noon, any time — and open their eyes. Books etc., won’t do — give them oral teaching. Then slowly extend your centres. Can you do all this? Or only bell-ringing?

- Swami Vivekananda

[Source: Selected portions from the complete Works of Swami Vivekananda ]Sister Nivedita and Monks serving plague affected poor in Kolkata:


Krishna says first thing in the Bhagavad gita, that this body is temporary and it is of dead matter. so dont worry about this body too much and also he talks about karma which means we are what we are according to our previous activities. So there is no point in complaining about our present situation because we desrve what we have. Yes as humans we must be compassionate to other people’s traumas but that doesnt mean we make malicious statements of equating god with humans, no way god is god, man is man and dog is dog. There is a differance between each living entity. we must recognise the material differance. Spiritually yes we are all one but that does not mean we are all materially same. Recognise the distinction first then only u can proceed. Dont get into analysing things which u dont know.

Krishna says in the bhagavad gita unequivocally that “He is the Supreme Lord. No one is more superior to him”. So ur saying that living god, dead god wats all this man, stupid fool go and read and dont interpret u dumbo, u think u got the brains to interpret the supreme lord’s words idiot. Just accept man u foolish upstart with a facade of dogooder .

Pls dont publish or send these kind of malicious, blasphemous mails anymore, U have no idea to the disservice that ur doing to lord Sri krishna and his pure and sublime teachings.

Better shut ur mouth and maintain ur family, Dont get into giving lectures on lord krishna or his teachings ur simply not good ok.


Ramakrishna - Vivekananda

One place in Calcutta not to be missed was the Dakshineswar Temple complex that houses the living room and bed where the avatar Ramakrishna had given many of his discourses to his followers. His teachings emphasized that God-realization is the highest goal of life, love and devotion for God, the oneness of existence, and the harmony of religions. He also preached that money is an obstacle in the path of spiritual progress.

In this living room Sri Ramakrishna’s disciple Vivekananda hid a coin under the bed to test if his guru really could not touch money. Throughout his later life Ramakrishna refused to handle money saying it was impossible for him to hold money or metal (which also symbolised coins) as he would feel pain and his hand would be forced aside. In the past while sat by the Ganges Ramakrishna used to take a rupee in one hand and a clump of clay in the other. He would throw both into the holy river reminding us that both are useless for realizing God.

When Sri Ramakrishna sat on the bed containing the hidden coin he shouted in pain and was thrown to the floor as if he had been hit by an electric shock. Sadly I noted that now there is a temple collection box right by the side of the bed! It is also the only temple where you have to pay for the prasad! (Holy food that contains the blessing of the temple’s deity or holy man) Nonetheless the devotional love of Ramakrishna, his spirit of simplicity and surrender still permeates this temple and it was an inspiring place to visit. I’m sure the residue of his spiritual influence touched my soul.

From the temple ghat we sat and watched the sun set casting brilliant colours over the Hooghly River and simultaneously transforming the Calcutta skyline into a highlighted silhouette of deep violets and grey blue tones. Once darkness fell we hired a small very dodgy looking boat to take us down river to Vivekananda’s impressive Belur Math Shrine on the other side of the river. (Incidentally Vivekananda’s books are a must-read for anyone wanting to understand Indian spirituality – wonderfully inspiring)

As we disembarked and headed towards the temple we could hear strange eerie mantras to Kali, the goddess who carries the severed heads (egos) of her devotees around her neck. Sometimes you can feel completely absorbed by India and at other times you feel like a stranger who has accidentally stumbled into a bizarre world of idols and unfamiliar ritual. Sat in the temple amongst the echoing tones and whiffed by the smell of amber incense under the tall pillars of in this large, shadowy building I had the feeling that I’d slipped into a scene from Indiana Jones. I reached for my whip.

Hare Krishna

I am not a lover of religion organised on a grand scale. I’m not a joiner. I feel I gained far more from the simple rooms of the gurus and the places they meditated and the people we met than I did from the grandiose temples and ashrams. And this feeling particularly applied to the next place we stayed: The Hare Krishna Ashram at Mayapur 130 km north of Calcutta.

Ramakrishna

When I was a teenager I visited the first Hare Krishna temple in 7 Bury Place near the British Museum, London. As part of their ritual before satsang (a meeting for discussion) they poured a little blessed milk into my palm and asked me to drink it. It was only afterwards that they said “This milk has been used to wash the feet of our beloved guru!” Not a good start but nonetheless the followers I’d met in the past were often intelligent, certainly very devoted and occasionally – it has to be said - a bit mixed up.

John Lennon certainly didn’t hold his punches when he met A.C Bhaktivedanta Swami Prabhupada the then leader of the International Society for Krishna Consciousness movement. He did not easily accept the authority and ‘say so’ of gurus and the transcripts of the meetings often show Lennon in what I read as a sarcastic tone of voice – particularly when he is advised that he should study the Gita in the original Sanskrit. “Study Sanscrit? ask Lennon. Oh, now you’re talking.”

Swami Prabhupada did however make a deep impression on George Harrison whose life and spiritual merits are a good example of the values he discovered through Krishna so I clearly do not want to appear disparaging of what to some is an important spiritual path but one I feel is not mine.

The Mayapur complex was certainly very impressive in its scale and architectural accomplishment but this was not a place that touched my soul. During the early morning Aarati the Hare Krishna devotees danced around waving their hands in the air and chanting the Hare Krishna mantras. I joined in – when in Rome and all that - but with not quite the same enthusiasm I enjoyed with the bhajans and mantras at other settings. Perhaps I was just too, too tired from so many days and nights of nail biting travel, perhaps devotional singing was not for me, but here I felt like an alien. At the climax of the chanting, plush red velvet curtains drew back to reveal a huge brightly coloured statue of Krishna surrounded by eight Gopi girls. It was all a bit ‘over the top’ and Disneyesque bad taste. I giggled manically to myself when it struck me that this was like worshiping super-dolls housed a giant, glitzy Barbie House.

It was definitely time to fly home.

India has reminded me that life is both an outer and an inner journey. Connecting with India’s energy and the spirit of its teachers past and present has helped me to understand what Patanjali says is the goal. Yoga he says is the movement into the absolute stillness of being. Here we can discover our true Self and find a wisdom, which transcends all worldly knowledge. I believe that India has shown me that the goal is near.


Death of Swami Vivekananda-

Around 1884, when he was forty-eight, his throat began to bleed. At first it was diagnosed as 'clergyman's sore throat' and treated as such. But as the bleeding continued, the malady was recognized for what it was: cancer. Swami Vivekananda had once prophesied that he would not live to be fifty. He died on July 4, 1902, six months before the target he had set for himself.

Soon the chapel bell rang the seven o'clock call for evening worship. Quietly, with a word that none should disturb him, he went to his own room for an hour's meditation. Then he called one of his disciples in and asked him to open all the windows and fan his head. Without a word, he lay down and a silence enveloped the room. The disciple continued to fan the Swami. Minutes passed and not a word was uttered. It was presumed that Vivekananda was either sleeping or gone into deep meditation and in any event it was not for the disciple to disturb him either by word or deed.

At the end of an hour, says Swami Nikhilananda in the Swami's official biography, Vivekananda's hands trembled a little and he seemed to take a deep breath. There followed a shattering silence. The Swami again took a similar deep breath. 'His eyes became fixed in the center of his eyebrows, his face assumed a divine expression and eternal silence fell.'

From 'Philosophy of Death and Dying' by M.V. Kamath.

Swami Vivekananda did not die, but gave up his body voluntarily in an act of yoga

called mahasamadhi, as did his master, Sri Ramakrishna, writes Charles Franc, July 1998. It was the latter, not Vivekananda - he suffered from dropsy and other nagging ailments - who had throat cancer. 'Swami Vivekananda passed away at the age of thirty-nine years, five months, and twenty-four days, thus fulfilling his own prophecy: "I shall not live to be forty years old"' (Nikhilananda, p. 178)-

Source(s):

-http://www.globalideasbank.org/natdeath/…

On July 4, 1902 at Belur Math near Kolkata, he taught Vedanta philosophy to some pupils in the morning. He had a walk with Swami Premananda, a brother-disciple and gave him instructions concerning the future of the Ramakrishna Math.Vivekananda died of heart failure at the young age of 40

died of continued illness , died young, but died after seeing what he lived to die for. a hindu monk could not have accomplished so much in so short time. none of the western ecclesiasticals at world religious meet in Chicago (1893)would think fit to challenge the treatises in Vedanta when he thundered that the vedic Hindu creed teaches no hatred jealousy meant no exvlusive identity for Indian but called upon world citizen to respond to "Vasudhaiv Kutumbakam". the recognition he recieved from the west left Indian nationalists' rising spirits with mounting moral to charge head on upon the raj's tottering existence

Answers.com : On July 4, 1902 at Belur Math near Calcutta, he taught Vedanta philosophy to some pupils in the morning. He had a walk with Swami Premananda, a brother-disciple, and gave him instructions concerning the future of the Ramakrishna Math. He passed away in the evening after a session of prayer at Belur Math. He was 39. Doctors pronounced that the death was due to apoplexy, but the monks were convinced that he had attained mahasamadhi, as Sri Ramakrishna had predicted. Vivekananda had fulfilled his own prophecy of not living to be forty-years old.

Vivekananda was born on January 12th, 1863.

"On July 4, 1902 at Belur Math near Kolkata, he taught Vedanta philosophy to some pupils in the morning. He had a walk with Swami Premananda, a brother-disciple and gave him instructions concerning the future of the Ramakrishna Math.Vivekananda died of heart failure at the young age of 40."


Best Quotes from Swami Vivekananda

Published by uttishthata December 7th, 2006 in Vivekananda.

“It may be that I shall find it good to get outside of my body – to cast it off like a disused garment.

But I shall not cease to work! I shall inspire men everywhere, until the world shall know that it is one with God.”

“My ideal, indeed, can be put into a few words, and that is to preach unto mankind their divinity,

and how to make it manifest in every moment of life.

“Religion is the manifestation of the divinity already present in man.

Religion is the idea which is raising the brute unto man, and man unto God.

“The secret of religion lies not in theories but in practice. To be good and do good - that is the whole of religion.

“Man is higher than all animals, than all angels; none is greater than man.”

“Men, men, these are wanted; everything else will be ready, but strong, vigorous, believing young men, sincere to the backbone are wanted.

“My faith is in the younger generation, the modern generation, out of them will come my workers. They will work out the whole problem like lions.

“Numbers do not count, nor does wealth or poverty, a handful of men can throw the world off its hinges, provided they are united in thought, word and deed.”

“Before flooding India with socialistic or political ideas, first deluge the land with spiritual ideas.

“After so much austerity, I have understood this as the real truth - God is present in every jiva; there is no other God besides that.

“Who serves jiva, serves God indeed.

“Mankind ought to be taught that religions are but the varied expressions of THE RELIGION, which is Oneness, so that each may choose the path that suits him best.”

Please down load from the following link: http://tinyurl.com/y6cez5

Vivekananda’s Maha-Samadhi

REGARDING THE SWAMI’S DEATH, JULY 4, 1902,

AND

HIS 1898 POEM “TO THE FOURTH OF JULY.”

The cause of Swami Vivekananda’s death on the 4th of July, 1902, has been long debated as whether it was a deliberate act of will—through the Swami’s powers of yoga, or took place because of his illness, aggravated by over-exertion.One fact that might favor the former view is that the Swami wrote a poem in praise of the 4th of July, on that date in 1898.Written when he was travelling in Kashmir with some disciples, including some American and English disciples—it was read aloud at breakfast that early morning.

The poem was preserved by one of his American disciples, Mrs. Ole Bull.

While it may have been a coincidence and possibly not unique that someone wrote a poem in praise of the day/holiday on which he happened later to die, it may be singular that it was written by someone whose death has been much debated as to its cause (and for reasons other than this poem).

Moreover, the Swami’s meaning in the poem, while clearly referencing the ideal of Amercan freedom celebrated on this holiday, possibly alludes to a greater more eternal freedom…

The Swami passed away at the age of thirty-nine years, five months and twenty-four days, thus fulfilling a prophecy which was frequently on his lips, “I shall never live to see forty.”

Three days before his passing away, as the Swami was walking up and down on the spacious lawn of the monastery in the afternoon with Swami Premananda, he pointed to a particular spot on the bank of the Ganga, and said to his brother-monk gravely, “When I give up the body, cremate it there!” On that very spot stands today a temple in his honour.

Sister Nivedita, introducing many significant facts in connection with the Swami’s passing away and his foreknowledge of it, writes:

When June closed, however, he knew well enough that the end was near. “I am making ready for death!” he said to one who was with him, on the Wednesday before he died. “A great Tapasya and meditation has come upon me, and I am making ready for death!”

Once in Kashmir, after an attack of illness, I had seen him lift a couple of pebbles, saying, “Whenever death approaches me, all weakness vanishes. I have neither fear, nor doubt, nor thought of the external. I simply busy myself making ready to die. I am as hard as that” — and the stones struck one another in his hand — “for I have touched the Feet of God!”

Personal revelation was so rare with him, that these words could never be forgotten. Again, on returning from the cave of Amarnath, in that same summer of 1898, had he not said, laughingly, that he had there received the grace of Amarnath — not to die till he himself should will to do so? Now this, seeming to promise that death would never take him by surprise, had corresponded so well with the prophecy of Shri Ramakrishna — that when he should know who and what he was, he would refuse to remain a moment longer in the body — that one had banished from one’s mind all anxiety on this score, and even his own grave and significant words at the present time did not suffice to revive it.

Did we not remember, moreover, the story of the great Nirvikalpa Samadhi of his youth, and how, when it was over, his Master had said, “This is your mango. Look! I lock it in my box. You shall taste it once more, when your work is finished!” “…And we may wait for that,” said the monk who told me the tale. “We shall know when the time is near. For he will tell us that, again he has tasted his mango.”

How strange it seems now, looking back on that time, to realize in how many ways the expected hint was given, only to fall on ears that did not hear, to reach minds that could not understand!

It would seem, indeed, that, in his withdrawal from all weakness and attachment, there was one exception. That, which had ever been dearer to him than life, kept still its power to move him. It was on the last Sunday before the end that he said to one of his disciples, “You know, the work is always my weak point! When I think that might come to an end, I am all undone!”

On Wednesday [July 2] of the same week, the day being Ekadashi, and himself keeping the fast in all strictness, he insisted on serving the morning meal to the same disciple [Nivedita]. Each dish as it was offered–boiled seeds of the jackfruit, boiled potatoes, plain rice, and ice-cold milk–formed the subject of playful chat; and finally, to end the meal, he himself poured the water over the hands, and dried them with a towel.

“It is I who should do these things for you, Swamiji! Not you for me!” was the protest naturally offered. But his answer was startling in its solemnity — “Jesus washed the feet of His disciples!”

Something checked the answer — “But that was the last time!” — as it rose to the lips, and the words remained unuttered. This was well. For here also, the last time had come.

There was nothing sad or grave about the Swami during these days. In the midst of anxiety about over-fatiguing him, in spite of conversation deliberately kept as light as possible, touching only upon the animals that surrounded him, his garden experiments, books, and absent friends, over and beyond all this, one was conscious the while of a luminous presence, of which his bodily form seemed only as a shadow or symbol. Never had one felt so strongly as now, before him, that one stood on the threshold of an infinite light. Yet none was prepared, least of all on that last happy Friday, July the 4th, on which he appeared so much stronger and better than he had been for years, to see the end so soon.

On the day of the Mahasamadhi itself, whether consciously or intuitively, his actions were most deliberate and full of meaning. His solitary meditation for three hours in the morning from eight to eleven was the most striking. He rose rather early that day and, after partaking of his tea, entered the chapel of the monastery. After some time it was noticed that he had closed all the windows and bolted all the doors. What transpired there, no one will ever know. In his meditation his own Master and the Divine Mother — to his own realization One and the Same Personality — must have been present, for, when he had finished, he broke forth in a touching song in which the highest Jnana mingled with the highest Bhakti.

Descending the stairs of the shrine, he walked back and forth in the courtyard of the monastery, his mind withdrawn. Suddenly the tenseness of his thought expressed itself in a whisper loud enough to be heard by Swami Premananda who was nearby. The Swami was saying to himself, “If there were another Vivekananda, he would have understood what Vivekananda has done! And yet, how many Vivekanandas shall be born in time!!” This remark startled his brother-disciple, for never did the Swami speak thus, save when the flood-gates of his soul were thrown open and the living waters of the highest Consciousness rushed forth.

To The Fourth Of July

Behold, the dark clouds melt away,

That gathered thick at night, and hung

So like a gloomy pall above the earth!

Before thy magic touch, the world

Awakes. The birds in chorus sing.

The flowers raise their star-like crowns-

Dew-set, and wave thee welcome fair.

The lakes are opening wide in love

Their hundred thousand lotus-eyes

To welcome thee, with all their depth.

All hail to thee, thou Lord of Light!

A welcome new to thee, today,

O sun! today thou sheddest LIBERTY!

Bethink thee how the world did wait,

And search for thee, through time and clime.

Some gave up home and love of friends,

And went in quest of thee, self banished,

Through dreary oceans, through primeval forests,

Each step a struggle for their life or death;

Then came the day when work bore fruit,

And worship, love, and sacrifice,

Fulfilled, accepted, and complete.

Then thou, propitious, rose to shed

The light of FREEDOM on mankind.

Move on, O Lord, on thy resistless path!

Till thy high noon o’erspreads the world.

Till every land reflects thy light,

Till men and women, with uplifted head,

Behold their shackles broken, and

Know, in springing joy, their life renewed!

-Swami Vivekananda

http://www.uttishthata.org/life-teachings/vivekananda's-maha-samadhi/

Death of Swami Vivekananda-

Around 1884, when he was forty-eight, his throat began to bleed. At first it was diagnosed as 'clergyman's sore throat' and treated as such. But as the bleeding continued, the malady was recognized for what it was: cancer. Swami Vivekananda had once prophesied that he would not live to be fifty. He died on July 4, 1902, six months before the target he had set for himself.

Soon the chapel bell rang the seven o'clock call for evening worship. Quietly, with a word that none should disturb him, he went to his own room for an hour's meditation. Then he called one of his disciples in and asked him to open all the windows and fan his head. Without a word, he lay down and a silence enveloped the room. The disciple continued to fan the Swami. Minutes passed and not a word was uttered. It was presumed that Vivekananda was either sleeping or gone into deep meditation and in any event it was not for the disciple to disturb him either by word or deed.

At the end of an hour, says Swami Nikhilananda in the Swami's official biography, Vivekananda's hands trembled a little and he seemed to take a deep breath. There followed a shattering silence. The Swami again took a similar deep breath. 'His eyes became fixed in the center of his eyebrows, his face assumed a divine expression and eternal silence fell.'

From 'Philosophy of Death and Dying' by M.V. Kamath.

Swami Vivekananda did not die, but gave up his body voluntarily in an act of yoga called mahasamadhi, as did his master, Sri Ramakrishna, writes Charles Franc, July 1998. It was the latter, not Vivekananda - he suffered from dropsy and other nagging ailments - who had throat cancer. 'Swami Vivekananda passed away at the age of thirty-nine years, five months, and twenty-four days, thus fulfilling his own prophecy: "I shall not live to be forty years old"' (Nikhilananda, p. 178) -

Source(s):

-http://www.globalideasbank.org/natdeath/…

When his soul left the body known as Vivekananda.

Raghavendra R :He died because of over powered , i.e. he was meditating to the extreme and he controlled his sakthi beyond his health condition and died befor 40 years. Yours VRVRAO

Muthu S :Swamy vivekananda breathed his last due to Asthma.

nagarajan s : Ramakrishna Paramahamsa has predicted to one of his close disciple, "the moment "Naren", realises his real identity, he will not continue the earthly career. Vivekananda has chosen to relinquish his earthy career but he has not revealed this to any one. One day he was meditating and asked the disciple near him to fan him with a hand held palm pan. Swami Vivekananda has voluntarily taken his pran to the higher plane and relinquished his body. one or two drops of blood was noticed near his lips or nostrils. He is a paripurna Yogi who has chosen his own time. It is also reliabily learnt that he had already taken birth in Sri Lanka several years ago and he is likely to be around 30 yrs of age now.

anon :it is not important how he died. but how he lived, what he taught.read some of his teachings at http://www.gitananda.org/vedanta-s-messa…

Source(s):http://www.gitananda.org

Weston : Death of Swami Vivekananda

Around 1884, when he was forty-eight, his throat began to bleed. At first it was diagnosed as 'clergyman's sore throat' and treated as such. But as the bleeding continued, the malady was recognized for what it was: cancer. Swami Vivekananda had once prophesied that he would not live to be fifty. He died on July 4, 1902, six months before the target he had set for himself.

Soon the chapel bell rang the seven o'clock call for evening worship. Quietly, with a word that none should disturb him, he went to his own room for an hour's meditation. Then he called one of his disciples in and asked him to open all the windows and fan his head. Without a word, he lay down and a silence enveloped the room. The disciple continued to fan the Swami. Minutes passed and not a word was uttered. It was presumed that Vivekananda was either sleeping or gone into deep meditation and in any event it was not for the disciple to disturb him either by word or deed.

At the end of an hour, says Swami Nikhilananda in the Swami's official biography, Vivekananda's hands trembled a little and he seemed to take a deep breath. There followed a shattering silence. The Swami again took a similar deep breath. 'His eyes became fixed in the center of his eyebrows, his face assumed a divine expression and eternal silence fell.'

From 'Philosophy of Death and Dying' by M.V. Kamath.

Swami Vivekananda did not die, but gave up his body voluntarily in an act of yoga called mahasamadhi, as did his master, Sri Ramakrishna, writes Charles Franc, July 1998. It was the latter, not Vivekananda - he suffered from dropsy and other nagging ailments - who had throat cancer. 'Swami Vivekananda passed away at the age of thirty-nine years, five months, and twenty-four days, thus fulfilling his own prophecy: "I shall not live to be forty years old"' (Nikhilananda, p. 178)

Source(s):

http://www.globalideasbank.org/natdeath/…

Jumping Sun :Raghavendra's answer is close to the true. I have learnt from a most learned person I ever met in life that Swami Vivekanand was a celibate in true sense. In his entire life he never ejaculated even once. Due to this, there was so much 'Tej' in his face. Due to his so severe celibacy, his semen become so powerful that his testicles became unable to hold it and hence bursted causing his death.

Now, how far this statement is true, I would like to know. But the gentleman from whom I heard, is the most intelligent and knowledgeable man, one could ever meet.

rani : Around 1884, when he was forty-eight, his throat began to bleed. At first it was diagnosed as 'clergyman's sore throat' and treated as such. But as the bleeding continued, the malady was recognized for what it was: cancer. Swami Vivekananda had once prophesied that he would not live to be fifty. He died on July 4, 1902, six months before the target he had set for himself.

Soon the chapel bell rang the seven o'clock call for evening worship. Quietly, with a word that none should disturb him, he went to his own room for an hour's meditation. Then he called one of his disciples in and asked him to open all the windows and fan his head. Without a word, he lay down and a silence enveloped the room. The disciple continued to fan the Swami. Minutes passed and not a word was uttered. It was presumed that Vivekananda was either sleeping or gone into deep meditation and in any event it was not for the disciple to disturb him either by word or deed.

At the end of an hour, says Swami Nikhilananda in the Swami's official biography, Vivekananda's hands trembled a little and he seemed to take a deep breath. There followed a shattering silence. The Swami again took a similar deep breath. 'His eyes became fixed in the center of his eyebrows, his face assumed a divine expression and eternal silence fell.'

From 'Philosophy of Death and Dying' by M.V. Kamath.

Swami Vivekananda did not die, but gave up his body voluntarily in an act of yoga called mahasamadhi, as did his master, Sri Ramakrishna, writes Charles Franc, July 1998. It was the latter, not Vivekananda - he suffered from dropsy and other nagging ailments - who had throat cancer. 'Swami Vivekananda passed away at the age of thirty-nine years, five months, and twenty

sagaruki... :Death

On July 4, 1902 at Belur Math near Calcutta, he taught Vedanta philosophy to some pupils in the morning. He had a walk with Swami Premananda, a brother-disciple and gave him instructions concerning the future of the Ramakrishna Math. Vivekananda died suddenly later that day. He had predicted that he would die before the age of 40, which proved to be true when he died at the age of 39.[2]

Source(s):

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swami_Vivek…


Death of Swami Vivekananda

Around 1884, when he was forty-eight, his throat began to bleed. At first it was diagnosed as 'clergyman's sore throat' and treated as such. But as the bleeding continued, the malady was recognized for what it was: cancer. Swami Vivekananda had once prophesied that he would not live to be fifty. He died on July 4, 1902, six months before the target he had set for himself.

Soon the chapel bell rang the seven o'clock call for evening worship. Quietly, with a word that none should disturb him, he went to his own room for an hour's meditation. Then he called one of his disciples in and asked him to open all the windows and fan his head. Without a word, he lay down and a silence enveloped the room. The disciple continued to fan the Swami. Minutes passed and not a word was uttered. It was presumed that Vivekananda was either sleeping or gone into deep meditation and in any event it was not for the disciple to disturb him either by word or deed.

At the end of an hour, says Swami Nikhilananda in the Swami's official biography, Vivekananda's hands trembled a little and he seemed to take a deep breath. There followed a shattering silence. The Swami again took a similar deep breath. 'His eyes became fixed in the center of his eyebrows, his face assumed a divine expression and eternal silence fell.'

From 'Philosophy of Death and Dying' by M.V. Kamath.

Swami Vivekananda did not die, but gave up his body voluntarily in an act of yoga called mahasamadhi, as did his master, Sri Ramakrishna, writes Charles Franc, July 1998. It was the latter, not Vivekananda - he suffered from dropsy and other nagging ailments - who had throat cancer. 'Swami Vivekananda passed away at the age of thirty-nine years, five months, and twenty-four days, thus fulfilling his own prophecy: "I shall not live to be forty years old"' (Nikhilananda, p. 178)

Old man dying at a Dalai Lama talk

One year in Bodh Gaya the Dalai Lama gave a week of teachings and initiations, and over 100,000 people came from the various Himalayan kingdoms. Babies were born in this time, and several old people died. One night I saw an old man sitting under a tree. He sat in peace and serenity, quietly saying his prayers and rejoicing in his good fortune at having made it to the holy place of Bodh Gaya at such an auspicious time. He looked over at the group I was with and beamed us an enormous smile. A few minutes later he leaned back against the tree and, still sitting in the meditation posture, passed away. His face expressed perfect contentment.

From 'Death and Dying' by Glenn H. Mullin.


[ This is a compilation I have done by searching internet contents so as to present all the information about Swami Vivekananda at one place.

For suggestions please contact me at: sandipkptiwari@gmail.com ]


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